horse sketch

IMG_2293

Should I stop here or should I continue? Does this look like a horse? This is how I was taught to draw, start out by blobbing in the general size and shape of the subject. By this point I’ve moved the legs half a dozen times but I’m trying to make the negative spaces between the legs look like my model.

I worked on this about 1/2 hour. That’s how long my attention span lasts for sketching, then I need to take a break. I’ll get back on it and try to refine it but there’s no rush. Taking frequent breaks refreshes my concentration.

One great thing about drawing is that you can take it in any direction you like. If you don’t want to render a finished drawing you don’t have to. If you want to draw from your imagination or do abstract drawing that’s fine too.  That’s why I wonder what’s up when I read an article where the writer uses the words “slavishly copying”, like that’s bad.. To me, accuracy is important. I enjoy copying something beautiful. I feel like I’ve studied it in more depth if I get a tight drawing. In the long run, I’ll have a better file of it in my brain that I’ll be able to use if I want to draw that subject again, only it’s moving, or not in front of me. I won’t need to look up a photo of it. But drawing this way is a discipline. It helps if it was forced on you when you were young. hahaha The people who say slavishly copying, they can’t do a tight study.

12 thoughts on “horse sketch”

  1. It definitely looks like a horse. My drawing education, however, taught me to make every line count–which is exactly the opposite of your method. So—I can’t really offer any advice here. I do make some tiny measuring marks before I make every line count, but I still hear my mentor’s words while drawing: “no chicken scratches”!!!! So for me, a line has to be a line, not a series of short strokes. No criticism here, just do whatever works for you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your thoughts. Every artist has their own path. I erase as many lines as I draw. I’ll try to take the proportions, but I find that difficult with horse anatomy since the head is out in front of the body, not above like a human figure.

      Liked by 1 person

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