Rudee Inlet at Sundown / pastel

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Long ago, when I was a young chick in art school, they insisted we must learn linear perspective using vanishing points. It was too technical for me. I promptly forgot what I learned. After doing a few vanishing point exercises I decided if I wanted to draw architecture I’d just eyeball it.

It’s not easy to draw architecture. I have to try at least twice and it’s still not exactly right but it’s not annoying my eyes so this will do. My perspective is a little off and my proportions are a little off, I hope it’s not noticeable.

When I can get my lines straight I’m happy. I did this all free hand not using a photo or even a ruler. To check my lines for straightness I look at my drawing on the edge the way you look down the edge of a board to see if it’s warped, tilting the drawing so I’m not looking straight at it but kind of looking sideways. Then I can see where my lines go off straight and it’s easier to make corrections. It might seem like a slow process to draw straight lines this way but  I want to do it freehand and practice will pay off in the long run.

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This is a close up showing two focal points. The light in the foreground is a focal point because it’s contrasting with the bridge support that is partially illuminated by it, that support being the only one with a lot of light on it, and the dark lines going behind it on a slant. The secondary focal point in the background is a streetlight far away. It’s white against black, so if a viewer’s eye is zooming in on details their eye will stop there and look at the background for a second before moving on. You can see some sketchy boats in this photo which aren’t a focal point and aren’t even noticeable from far away.  Yeah, those are boats. I could hardly see them from where I was but I drew them anyway. (artistic license – draw as much or as little as you want to)

The lines look tilted because I wasn’t holding my camera exactly square to the paper.

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This close up shows reflections continuing from above the bridge to below it. I wanted to have some light reflecting under the bridge to tie the top to the lower part with a little light. That’s another secondary focal point on the far right of the drawing because of the white square on the black background and the orange square next to it.

Sundown was my favorite time of day to draw this scene from the balcony of my hotel. A half hour earlier the sun was glaring on the water so bright I couldn’t look in that direction. A half hour later and the buildings in the background blended in with the trees’ darkness.

I started this pastel in Plein air at the inlet on the 6th floor of the hotel. I did my drawing and picked my colors in plein air. Then I got an apartment and moved in. After a couple days I stopped unpacking and organizing the apt. so I could finish this. Now I have to get back to the unpacking job before I start another art project.

17 thoughts on “Rudee Inlet at Sundown / pastel”

  1. I don’t usually like architectural paintings but there’s something about this one that grabs my attention. I love it. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I especially liked the evening sky and the lit up lights. Even the houses. There’s a lot going on in this picture which hints at something much more. Brilliant!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I’ve been trying to get my head round what it is that grabs me about this pastel. I think that it is because it’s ‘believable’ – it transports me from deep in the Welsh countryside to a ‘cityscape’ in another part of the world – somewhere I’ve never been. I could be there. It ‘lives’!

    Right – that’s got that out of my head!

    Stay safe and well.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I love this and I love your other plein air stuff. You are right, architectural is hard. I don’t get good results if I use a ruler. I prefer to eyeball my “straight” lines as well. Though I’m usually painting naturalistic landscapes that are a little more forgiving.

    Liked by 1 person

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