Category Archives: Chrysler Museum

Diana after Powers / charcoal

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Yesterday was too hot to draw outside so I went to the Chrysler Museum to sketch. I worked on it for a little over an hour and went back today and was there  for another hour or so. I can’t tell if this looks like the marble bust or not.

I’d like to try to paint a portrait but I don’t want to pay a model. I could do a self portrait but I don’t enjoy looking at my reflection. So I’ll see if I can paint Diana like a fauve. If it comes out ugly she won’t be offended.

I don’t care too much if I mess it up. I’ll do my best, but no guarantees. I have practically no ego for an artist. Should I blame my parents for that or thank them?

My art school was a trade school but I learned to draw and paint in the traditional ways. That doesn’t mean I don’t like modern art.  Is it really important to stick to a certain style? I don’t think so, but there are people who tell an artist to pick a medium or style and stick to it. I heard a juror say, “Don’t mix two different styles.” I didn’t ask for the reason and I don’t know the styles well enough to know if I’m doing that, but I thought she was talking to me.

I like looking at photography even though I don’t do it. I like a lot of modern art even though my attempts to do it don’t usually work out. Most artists try different things and go through their phases. Matisse, who I always liked, tried fauvism so I want to try it too. I’ll use this sketch.

Ariadne charcoal after Ives

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Isn’t she beautiful? She’s made of marble and you can find her at the Chrysler Museum, Norfolk VA.

Continuing with my portrait practice, I went to the museum because it was raining. I have all my practice portraits of the famous dead artists taped on the wall and I don’t like any of them. They’re all going out with the garbage. I’ll keep this one. This gives me some hope that I’m getting a little better at portraiture. Why did my sketches of the dead artists come out stiff looking compared to this? I think it’s because this time I had a more graceful model.

The myth of Ariadne goes like this: She was the daughter of King Minos. She helped her lover Theseus escape from the labyrinth then they ran away together to the island of Naxos but Theseus abandons her there. The plaque says Ives made her looking down because she had a broken heart but not for long. Bacchus, the god of wine sees her on Naxos and immediately falls in love with her and they are happily wed.IMG_2054

Durn, my photo looks fuzzy. I’m not a real pro with a camera, as you can see. I’m including this pic so you can see for yourself if I got a likeness.

A Spray of Goldenrod by Charles Courtney Curran

At the Chrysler Museum in Norfolk VA.
At the Chrysler Museum in Norfolk VA.

It’s a great show of American Impressionists titled “The Artist’s Garden”. I drove to Norfolk yesterday to see it. The show ends in the beginning of Sept.

It’s exciting to see old Impressionism. There’s a lot of variations in the different artist’s styles. These artists had academic training. You can see it in the beautifully drawn female figures. An artist doesn’t get this kind of results by tracing a photo. This took years of figure drawing practice.

I wanted to see if the old Impressionists used glazes, and yes, I see layers of glazes in a lot of the paintings. Modern Impressionists don’t use glazes. This painting shows a lot of variation in the way the paint was applied. Some is glazes and some parts are painted thick.

The old Impressionists didn’t have a formula. I doubt this was finished in one day. They had inspiration. They were daring and groundbreaking. Modern Impressionists are in a big hurry to finish paintings because they think it makes them look “prolific”. They have a good level of successful paintings that are marketable because they have a formula, which they might call “streamlining” a painting, or “simplifying” or something like that. That’s why all modern Impressionists work looks the same. Modern Impressionists are on some kind of art treadmill. I want to paint like this guy, Curran.