Mondrian top

img_1860Dang, mine doesn’t look as chic as the original by YSL. I’m wearing it. no one else in town has it and there will be a show of YSL styles at the VMFA in May.

I don’t have much experience with piecing, and was wondering how to do this. Our fellow blogger Linda, of Nice Dress, Thanks, I made it, gave me a good tip, and I looked it up. It seems there’s more than one version of this design from the 60s, and more than one way to make it. Any way, it looked like it would be difficult, and it was. Everything that could go wrong, did go wrong, but I finished it.

Maybe I shouldn’t have used cotton, because it wrinkles too easily. I don’t know what fabric YSL used.img_1855First, I made it out of lining, because patterns don’t always fit as well as I hope they will. When I tried this on, it was a little too snug to reach my arms forward. I drew charcoal lines on this, where I thought the black stripes should go. It’s just a rough marking, because I was wearing it and drawing on myself. I was glad I took the time to make it out of lining first, because it would be disappointing if I did all the work of piecing it then it was too small. Then I took this one apart and decided where to mark my paper pattern for the color blocking.

I saw some Mondrian dresses online made like a straight shift with no darts. I considered that style, but decided to use and A- line dress pattern, so it would fit me better. And I need sleeves because in the summer I get an uneven tan on my arms, from painting outdoors wearing T shirts every day. I saw the old Vogue pattern had the vertical line in the center of the dress, but I wanted mine off center like the original, so I didn’t want the Vogue pattern even if I could buy it, which might be hard to find.

I did the piecing before cutting the pattern.img_1857

When I got to this point, I knew I made a mistake. The lines match up at the side seams laying flat like this, but after I sew the darts, it will shorten the front red block and the black lines on the back would not match the lines on the front at the side seams. I had already put a lot of time into it and didn’t want to give up, so I had to take the black line off the back pieces and move it up about 1 1/2″ . So that might be the reason for making the dress as a straight shift, to eliminate that problem. I got it to work so my black lines meet at the side seams ok, though. It was just another sewing problem to figure out, and that kind of thing happens if you experiment. There’s a way to fix every mistake.

I wore it with jeans today, but it would hang better over a skirt. So a skirt is my next project. It will be a simple straight skirt.

yellow bathrobe / spotted pajamas

img_1850

America wants me to paint, but I have to sew first because I really need some new clothes and I can’t find what I want in the stores.

A friend that I worked with at a sewing job years ago asked me why I go to the trouble of sewing when I can buy it for less on sale. She enjoys shopping more than I do to start with, but she did admit she never sees bathrobes in yellow. I wanted yellow not white. White is so generic and it doesn’t pick up my energy like yellow does on a dreary morning. And the pajamas in the stores are made of thin cheap fabric that shrinks in the dryer and wears out fast. If you go into a store and scan the room, you pick up black, white, gray, bright red and dark blue, but there’s no wide variety spectrum of colors available. It’s almost like our overlords want us to dress in a sort of uniform. What has happened to individualism? There’s no room for it. When will the garment industry pick up in the USA? This makes no sense to me. We can do better. Forget about all of us looking alike, and no class distinctions based on clothing.  Social engineering doesn’t work. When I wear my new fringed jacket, I can tell people are looking at it and judging me to be either rich or an artist. It makes me feel more respected. New clothes, nice colors, and fabrics, it all adds up to a better self esteem and energy. I’m just lucky I was pushed into sewing when I was young. Sewing is like drawing, you can learn at any age and make progress if you practice. Good teachers help.

I’m enjoying the pajama fabric. It’s so soft. From Joanne Fabrics. There’s a thin cloth backing on it which will make it hold up better in the wash too. And they fit just right because I put it on for a fitting and marked the waist before I put the elastic in.

Next project : steal the Mondrian dress. I think I can do it.

fringed jacket

img_1848Darling, will this make me look fat?

hahahahah I don’t care. I’m wearing it anyway.

The story of the jacket.

Long ago my Mom showed me this pattern and asked me if I wanted her to make it for me. I said, “OhHellYeah!!” because I’ve always loved fringe. The pattern said the jacket comes out looking elegant in black white and gray, and it looks striking in red white and  blue. I asked for the red white and blue one. I wore it all the time. Then when I couldn’t wash it again, because the fringe was not good anymore, I asked her if she still had the pattern. She didn’t.  I kept the jacket in the closet for years, sometimes I thought  about trying to copy it. I knew it would be difficult and time consuming so I put it off. Finally I got around to it. It took weeks. But I can’t find something I like when I shop for a jacket, so I had to do it. I tried to make a pattern by pinning the old jacket to aimg_1847 big sheet of packing material I had and tracing around it. The back front and sleeves of the jacket are all one piece. I cut a pattern out of denim and made a few corrections, trying to improve my rough first pattern. The denim felt too stiff and wouldn’t drape as nicely as my old jacket, which had a shell made of dress lining fabric. So the third time I cut the shape, I used the blue dress lining fabric and it seemed ok. Making that fringe took f-o-r-e-v-e-r- I had to cut 3 yards of the fabric into 1″ bias strips and join them up into one long piece. I had to draw chalk lines on the shell 1/2″ apart on an angle like the original. Then I had to sew each strip on until I had the whole shell covered. I worked on it a few days all day and a few days part of the day. Some days I had to let it go and do something else. But then I still had to go back and cut each strip the whole length to make a fringe. I had to do a lot of hand sewing because I wanted to cover my cut edges on the seams and I don’t have a serger. So, omg, what a big job that was.

Isn’t that a beautiful dress by YSL? I want it! And I think I might be able to STEAL IT!!! hahaha I really do want to get out of the house and paint in plein air, but not today. I’m going to  look at the pattern books and try to find a pattern that I can adapt to make the YSL. I would rather have it as a top than a dress. I could cut it off at the bottom of the black line. If I can’t find a pattern to use to fake the YSL, then I might not do it.

new duvet cover on top of new slipcover

img_1845The sewing bug got me. It’s uplifting to see my chair look better and yesterday I made this new duvet cover for my down filled throw.  I think it looks good on top of the chair. I flipped over the corner so you can see the ultra plush fleece I used for the backing. The front fabric is a batik and the blue trim is a thinner fleece.

It was more difficult because I used fleece. It stretched as I was sewing and I had to rip and fix it. I liked the color of the blue, that’s why I picked fleece for the trim instead of cotton. The cottons weren’t the exact blue I wanted. That’s one thing I really enjoy about sewing, the colors and textures in my hands. I have to keep my hands out of my paint, but sewing is kind of sculptural in the sense that it’s a more tactile experience than painting.Sewing is as challenging as painting. Unexpected problems always happen. You have to stop and figure out how to make it come out the way you want it.

Now the muse is telling me to make a jacket, so I must go out and shop for fabric. I have an old one  I can trace a pattern from. It’s covered in fringe but looks simple to make.

slipcover and sewing machine repair

img_1844Artists sometimes switch their medium. I feel like sewing lately. Sewing is an art form too. This chair neeeeeeded a new slipcover. I loved the sheen on this fabric. My daughter called it mermaid fabric. It’s kind of iridescent with purple and blue. It will probably hold up better than my last slipcover because it’s a tight weave with a cotton backing. I got it at UFab on sale for $17 a yard. That’s cheap for upholstery fabric.

Every time I make a slipcover, I think of my dear departed mother in law, Jackie Hill, who taught me to do slipcovers. She learned from her mother and wanted to pass the skill on to my generation but she had 3 boys. One reason she liked me more than she liked her other daughters in law was because I can sew. I wasn’t real gung ho to learn at the time, because I had a sewing job and was tired of sewing when I got home. I knew it would be difficult. Now I’m glad she taught me because I could make a living doing slipcovers if I wanted to, and for $150 invested in fabric, I can have a chair that looks like new. It’s not easy though. I scoot around on the floor a lot to cut it, so I’d rather not sew for customers these days.img_1843

This photo shows the sewing machine head tilted back and the oil pan underneath, with a sample of the cork I used to make a gasket on the bottom left.

I didn’t sew for a couple years, and when I looked at the old gasket, I knew the machine would leak oil like crazy. The gasket looked like it was chewed on by a mouse! I called the sewing machine store and asked if I could order a gasket for it but the man said they don’t make parts for this machine any more. I said “Oh no! What can I do for a gasket?” He told me to go to the auto parts store and buy cork because it holds up better than the original foam gasket that was in it. So I bought this thin cork and cut  1/2″ strips, because the old foam gasket looked like it was 1/2″ square. I placed my cork strips in the channel and continued around until I had the space filled in. Then I used silicone gel and glued it all together kind of thick. I had to trim some silicone off when it dried to make it smoother.

I’m happy because it’s working! The machine isn’t leaking oil!  In fact, when I leaned the head back to take this picture, it sounded like there was a real seal on it!  I probably saved myself $100 or $200 making the gasket myself and didn’t have to wait weeks for a mechanic to do it for me! Let me tell you how great this machine is. It’s a Singer 191. It’s over 20 years old and never dropped a stitch. This is a strong machine.

ok, I really want to get back to painting, but I just spent almost $100 on more fabric. I’m going to make a duvet cover for this little down filled throw a friend gave me. That’s how it is when you do a little redecorating, you can’t stop with just one thing.

Square Peg Round Hole

The life of an artistimg_1842

Hey, Look! I’m an Abstract Expressionist now!

Do you ever try to fit into a situation and you know it will never happen? That’s my inspiration, my social failure. To all my social misfit, square peg, friends out there, let me know if you ever find a square hole, because I’m still searching. Then all of us square pegs can get together and mock the round pegs. hahahahahahahaha

Meanwhile, just goofing around with this “Artist Tile Set”, Studio Series, scratch and sketch squares that my daughter got for me. It’s a card painted black over top of colors, or black on top of gold or silver. You scratch off the black. It’s a little scratchboard.

At least my daughter is popular, with over 1200 followers on Twitter. She started the cute baby animal challenge and got tweeted from zoos and aquariums all over the country and Europe. Check it out! #sarahjanethill

 

2 stained glass windows I love at the VMFA

img_1841Magnolia and Apple Blossom Window  /  Tiffanyimg_1838Jacques Gruber  /  French  /  1870 – 1936

I think I’ll steal one or both of these designs. Why should an artist put extra pressure on herself by trying to be “creative” and “original” when she could just copy something great? A lot of artists like to steal from the masters. There’s those funny books telling you how to steal like an artist. They crack me up. Then sometimes you still hear people saying, “It’s been done before.” like that’s a bad thing. I don’t get it. I go with the side of stealing a great design and making it my own. I remember our teachers at York Academy of Art told us one rule of stealing a design. Only steal the good stuff.

I can’t decide how to use one of these in my next project. I need to think it through and do a couple sketches first. Another funny contradiction you hear in the art world sometimes is, a teacher tells the students to just do it, don’t think about it. That sounds weird to me. I would have to take some kind of drug to stop from thinking.  What those teachers want is some subconscious thought to come out in the art.  They like a dream quality in art, I guess. I’m not doing that. I think there’s a reason why the subconscious is sub. It’s a bad decision maker.

These windows were well planned. That, and the great technical skill of the artists make them masterpieces.

Distelfink Walks Labyrinth

gold leaf on oil paintimg_1835

This is my 3rd experiment with masking fluid on oil paint.  I masked off the dark red border on the labyrinth and the gold leafed lines on the bird. The 24 carat gold leaf came out looking real warm on top of the dark red outline but it shows up a cool gold in my photo.

It’s a difficult, time consuming process making the masking fluid  work on oil paint. I wouldn’t recommend other artists try it. It takes a lot of prep time and patience. I’m still working out the bugs. I’m not sure if it’s showing in this photo, but you can see the weave of the canvas  through the dark red lines. If someone examines the paint closely, they’ll know I used some kind of stencil when they compare the thick textured paint to the lines.

I don’t have a lot of experience with gold leaf. It’s something I tried to do long ago and had the gold leaf all these years in my art supplies. I remember hearing you need a smooth surface for the leaf. That’s why I masked off the lines for the gold leaf. The paint can get thick and textured on the rest of the canvas, but should be smooth under the leaf.

The Distelfink is a folk art bird from PA. They mean good luck. Distelfink is PA Dutch for Thistle Finch. They’re native in Europe, not PA, but their images are all over Southeast PA.  I’ve always enjoyed drawing them. And I  enjoy the challenge of drawing geometric designs like the Greek key and Celtic knots. Making the labyrinth work out on the size I want is a math problem and takes me a while to figure out, even with the picture of a labyrinth in front of me. These are two designs I have used since I was a kid, so they’re a fall back design for my experiment.

So,  while the weather isn’t good over the winter, this is what I’m working on. My ultimate plan is to make an icon with oil paint and gold leaf, using a portrait of Edgar Alan Poe. The more practice I get, the better my chances are of success with the icon for a show in the spring at the Poe museum.

Distelfink on Hex / masking fluid on oil paint experiment #2

That was fun.
That was fun.
I'm not finished with this.
I’m not finished with these.

I can’t remember who first told me masking fluid doesn’t work on oil paint. It might have been long ago and I didn’t try it until this year. When I was shopping for a masking fluid to try, I asked the art supply store people if the more expensive Winsor Newton masking fluid is a better product than the ordinary friskit masking fluid and they said the Winsor Newton brand might be easier to lift when the paint is dry. If you leave the cheaper product on for a few days it can stick.  The guy working there asked me what kind of paper I was using. I told him I wanted to try it on canvas with oil paint. They said it doesn’t work on oil paint. I said I’m going to try it and see how it goes. If it doesn’t work, I’ll use it for something else.

I think it’s working ok on oil paint.  It was on the canvas over 2 weeks while I waited for the first layer of paint to dry. I mixed fast drying  Winsor Newton Liquin medium with my colors, but forgot to mix it with one of my glazes, and that blue took forever to dry.

This is the Distelfink on the red canvas with one layer of masking fluid and one layer of glazes.
This is the Distelfink on the red canvas with one layer of masking fluid and one layer of glazes.

I bought a deerfoot brush and dabbed the glazes on top of the masking fluid. The deerfoot is a nice brush to use for a glaze. It doesn’t entirely cover the color underneath.

That’s the blue background that took weeks to dry.

I want to paint eyes on my 2 Distelfinks then use this one on red and try another experiment. The last thing I want to try with it is putting gold leaf on the red outline of the bird.

It’s all part of my bigger plan to make an icon of Edgar Allan Poe. When I do my icon, I need an elaborate border for Poe’s portrait with oil paint and gold leaf.

So, why do they say masking fluid doesn’t work on oil paint? This isn’t too bad. If I try again,  maybe I can get the icon project to work out. I did a layer of masking fluid, a layer of glazes, then another layer of masking fluid and another layer of glazes. I had to wait  a couple weeks for it to dry and the masking fluid peeled off nicely.img_1831

This photo shows another experiment started with masking fluid on a tinted canvas. You can see the masking fluid is a little shiny on top of my charcoal sketch of flowers with 2 little distelfinks.

masking fluid on oil paint experiment

Yeah, that works. (kind of)
Yeah, that works. (kind of)

A few years ago I saw a painting by Maxfield Parrish, “Masquerade”, in Atlanta at the High Museum.  I was amazed by his technique.

Dang, this photo's not  clear.
Dang, this photo’s not clear.

All those little diamond shapes are sharp. And people think I paint tight! hahahaha  I wondered how he did it. The only thing I could guess was that he used masking fluid but people told me masking fluid doesn’t stick to oil paint. This painting was in the back of my mind for a long time. I saw a video about Parrish’s glazing technique but it didn’t discuss his technique of painting corners. The video gave me a lot to consider about glazing. I’ve been glazing with oil paint for a few years and I want to try more ways of glazing. The video also stressed Parrish’s use of varnish. I can’t use as much varnish as Parrish because it’s so strong my neighbors will smell it in their apartments too. I go outside to paint varnish but when the weather gets cold it takes a long time to dry.

Last week I planned some paintings to work on over the winter when I can’t get outside to paint as much. I bought a bottle of Winsor Newton water color masking fluid and tried it on a piece of an oil painting that I don’t like.  I drew a hex sign for my experiment because I’m PA Dutch and I’ve always liked to draw hex signs. I’m not superstitious. To me they’re a decoration. It’s fun to spin a compass around and make a perfect circle.

The PA Dutch put hex signs over the door to their barns to keep evil spirits out. Once I asked how a hex can keep out a bad spirit and was told that the spirit would think it could get into the barn through the hex sign, mistaking it for the door. It would hit it’s head on the hex sign and give up and go away. I can’t verify the PA Dutch really believe that. I’ve been away from that culture a long time.

ok, I digress. I want to try my experiment again using masking fluid on oil paint. This time, my surface will be smoother and I’ll use a ruling pen to paint my skinny lines.

No Camera Needed