Tag Archives: masking fluid

Celtic Knot / masking fluid on oil paint tips

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All it requires to use masking fluid on oil paint is time and patience. Here’s how.

Prep the canvas. The stretched canvases in the stores have a coat of gesso, but they’re a little rough. I sand my canvas, coat it with gesso, sand it again, another coat of gesso and a final sanding. Mix a little water in with the gesso so your paint is smooth as possible. I usually spread this canvas prep part out over a couple days. The smooth surface helps when painting lines.

Tint the canvas with thin oil paint. I used alizarin crimson. Add drops of turp slowly mixing them into the paint till you have thin paint. It doesn’t have to be too too thin, or the color might rub off later, but thinning the paint with turp spreads out the oil and the masking fluid will adhere to it nicely. If you have medium mixed in with the paint that might make the surface more oily and then the masking fluid wouldn’t flow off the brush well. So only use turp.

Give it a week to dry before painting the masking fluid on the tinted canvas. I put some soap on my brush before dipping it in the masking fluid. It helps with keeping the masking fluid flowing off the brush and not gumming it up.

Basically it’s the same as using masking fluid with water base paint, so I don’t know why they say it doesn’t work with oils. You paint right on top of it and peel it off after the paint dries.  The hardest part is waiting for your paint to dry so you can take off the masking fluid and reveal your creation! hahahah Sometimes it’s easier to take the masking fluid off. It just peels right up in a long strip. Sometimes it’s a little messier. That’s probably because my paint wasn’t dry enough.

If you don’t have the patience for slow drying oil paint, acrylic might work. I like oil, so, I had to give it a try.IMG_1969

I love Celtic knots. This book shows you how to draw them. You could put the book on a copier and blow it up to the size you need, but I like to follow the patterns and work it out like a puzzle. I drew my pattern with charcoal on brown wrap to the size I wanted. It’s an easy design to copy. Then went over it with magic marker to make my lines thicker before transferring it to my canvas.

I really appreciate this guy, George Bain for figuring out the patterns and publishing them, because I’ve used these designs so many times over the years.  And the original Celts, who came up with this type of design were genius!

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microscopic star dust life form, reproducing

IMG_1862gold leaf and beads on oil paint

This is another experiment using masking fluid on oil paint. They say it doesn’t work. They say masking fluid beads up on oil paint. I think they are misinformed about that.

I started with a red tinted canvas and painted the masking fluid on my Spirograph design blocking out a red line. Then painted the blues and greens over top of the masking fluid. I added quick drying medium to my paint but still had to wait a couple days for the it to dry before taking the masking fluid off . Then I put gold leaf on my red lines and put beads on the canvas.

I used 2 different sized lids to stamp the violet circles in the background. For the larger beads, I cut little slits in the canvas and pushed the beads half way in, then hot glued them on the back. I sewed the small beads onto the canvas.

The most difficult thing about using masking fluid on oil paint is opening the bottle. You have to press down on the lid and turn it. I hear a click but the lid doesn’t unscrew. After trying to open the bottle for a while, my hand gets tired and I get out some tools because I want to break the freaking lid. Then finally I can open it after much frustration.  I mean, COME ON! Winsor Newton. Can’t they make a better lid?!

About the life form; It fell out of the sky into the ocean. Now it is reproducing and will probably choke out all life on Earth !  Are you scared? I just scared myself! hahahah

Distelfink Walks Labyrinth

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This is my 3rd experiment with masking fluid on oil paint.  I masked off the dark red border on the labyrinth and the gold leafed lines on the bird. The 24 carat gold leaf came out looking real warm on top of the dark red outline but it shows up a cool gold in my photo.

It’s a difficult, time consuming process making the masking fluid  work on oil paint. I wouldn’t recommend other artists try it. It takes a lot of prep time and patience. I’m still working out the bugs. I’m not sure if it’s showing in this photo, but you can see the weave of the canvas  through the dark red lines. If someone examines the paint closely, they’ll know I used some kind of stencil when they compare the thick textured paint to the lines.

I don’t have a lot of experience with gold leaf. It’s something I tried to do long ago and had the gold leaf all these years in my art supplies. I remember hearing you need a smooth surface for the leaf. That’s why I masked off the lines for the gold leaf. The paint can get thick and textured on the rest of the canvas, but should be smooth under the leaf.

The Distelfink is a folk art bird from PA. They mean good luck. Distelfink is PA Dutch for Thistle Finch. They’re native in Europe, not PA, but their images are all over Southeast PA.  I’ve always enjoyed drawing them. And I  enjoy the challenge of drawing geometric designs like the Greek key and Celtic knots. Making the labyrinth work out on the size I want is a math problem and takes me a while to figure out, even with the picture of a labyrinth in front of me. These are two designs I have used since I was a kid, so they’re a fall back design for my experiment.

So,  while the weather isn’t good over the winter, this is what I’m working on. My ultimate plan is to make an icon with oil paint and gold leaf, using a portrait of Edgar Alan Poe. The more practice I get, the better my chances are of success with the icon for a show in the spring at the Poe museum.

masking fluid on oil paint experiment

Yeah, that works. (kind of)
Yeah, that works. (kind of)

A few years ago I saw a painting by Maxfield Parrish, “Masquerade”, in Atlanta at the High Museum.  I was amazed by his technique.

Dang, this photo's not  clear.
Dang, this photo’s not clear.

All those little diamond shapes are sharp. And people think I paint tight! hahahaha  I wondered how he did it. The only thing I could guess was that he used masking fluid but people told me masking fluid doesn’t stick to oil paint. This painting was in the back of my mind for a long time. I saw a video about Parrish’s glazing technique but it didn’t discuss his technique of painting corners. The video gave me a lot to consider about glazing. I’ve been glazing with oil paint for a few years and I want to try more ways of glazing. The video also stressed Parrish’s use of varnish. I can’t use as much varnish as Parrish because it’s so strong my neighbors will smell it in their apartments too. I go outside to paint varnish but when the weather gets cold it takes a long time to dry.

Last week I planned some paintings to work on over the winter when I can’t get outside to paint as much. I bought a bottle of Winsor Newton water color masking fluid and tried it on a piece of an oil painting that I don’t like.  I drew a hex sign for my experiment because I’m PA Dutch and I’ve always liked to draw hex signs. I’m not superstitious. To me they’re a decoration. It’s fun to spin a compass around and make a perfect circle.

The PA Dutch put hex signs over the door to their barns to keep evil spirits out. Once I asked how a hex can keep out a bad spirit and was told that the spirit would think it could get into the barn through the hex sign, mistaking it for the door. It would hit it’s head on the hex sign and give up and go away. I can’t verify the PA Dutch really believe that. I’ve been away from that culture a long time.

ok, I digress. I want to try my experiment again using masking fluid on oil paint. This time, my surface will be smoother and I’ll use a ruling pen to paint my skinny lines.