Tag Archives: oil paint sticks

A Portrait of the Poser as a Young Tree / mixed media

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Not to disrespect the tree, but why am I calling it a poser? The true identity of the tree is below.

This is another try at sketching  with oil paint sticks. They’re like big oily crayons, so it’s impossible to draw a skinny line or a small texture with them. They force me to draw fast and loose. One good thing about taking my oil paint sticks out to sketch in Plein air is that I don’t need to take my pallet, turpentine and brushes along. The bad thing is that I have to make do with the colors I have and can’t mix the colors as well on the paper as I would like to.

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This is an older tree of the same family. They’re called, Hitoki Falsecypress. The one I sketched is about 4 feet tall. So I’d tell the small tree,” There’s no need to feel bad about not being a real cypress tree, little poser. Some day you will be as big and respectable as your beautiful neighbor.”

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dragons on silk scarf / oil paint sticks

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Dragon one says to dragon two, “Gurrrl, how you doin?”

Dragon two says, “I’m good. How you doin?”

Dragon one says, “I’m fine. Lets go torch that big flock of sheep.”

Dragon two says, “Lets torch the castle instead. We can get their gold.”

Dragon one says ,”Good idea. Lets go.”IMG_2170

These are the new templates I made using my concoction of corn starch and Elmers glue piped out of a cake decorating bag onto foam  core. The foam core warped as it dried. I’ll try to find something that won’t warp for my next experimental template.

Dragon Head / mixed media / abstract

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Playing with my new art supplies today for tomorrow I drive.

This is an experiment using oil paint sticks and gelato watercolors on watercolor paper.

My daughter likes to find new types of art supplies for me to try. I’m not sure if I was using the gelato colors the right way. A funny syringe type watercolor brush comes with the kit but I didn’t see that it connects directly to the paint. The paint comes out of the tube like a lipstick and you can draw with it on dry paper and you can brush water into it. That’s what I got from the experiment.

I’m thinking of taking some different types of paint with me, besides my regular oils, when I go back to the marsh to draw in plein air again. The oil paint sticks might work because I don’t need to take my pallet, so that’s a lighter load in my bike basket. I don’t think I’ll take my easel, just a sketchbook.

Meanwhile, I’m having fun with my modern art experiments.

silk scarf painting / almost got it

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If I had a nice bright green oil paint stick this might work. I like the template more that the scarf. That’s ok. I’ll try again.  And my dragons: I wanted them to look scary, but they look like they’re saying, “How ya doin?”IMG_2164

I made  left and right templates so my dragons would both face up on the scarf. My daughter gave me some type of clay they called Think Putty. It’s not sticky and almost the right texture to pipe out of a cake decorating bag, so I added a lot of  Elmers glue to thin it and make it sticky. It piped nicely but was a mess to clean up since it’s not water soluble clay. I don’t know what it was made of but the glue blended in.

This method of painting on silk is like doing a rubbing. There are other ways to paint on silk that I haven’t learned, but I might try something else like dye instead of oil paint sticks and a template.

The molded plastic templates you buy in the art supply  stores give you a sharp image but my home made templates aren’t coming out with that look.

No big deal about wrecking this piece of silk.  The first pieces of silk I bought, I thought the width of the bolt would be ok for a scarf, but now I want to make 54″ scarves instead of using the 45″ width.

Then, I tried to use my folding foot on the sewing machine to make the hem on this practice piece and it didn’t work for me. The silk is slippery and I couldn’t keep it in the folding foot. I remembered long ago I made ruffled curtains and the folding foot wasn’t easy even on cotton.

I started sewing the hem by hand like the scarves imported from Thailand. It was going slowly and I decide to sew the hems by machine because my templates might not work anyway, and why spend the time hand sewing on these experiments? I’ll just straight stitch some hems.

I tried to make templates using string and glue on a board, but the string frayed at the cut edges which wasn’t what I wanted. Dragons should have points, not frayed ends. I used craft string and Elmers to glue my design on a piece of black foam core board that time. I’ll try again to make a template using something else. But the green putty is an improvement over the string.

That’s all the problems I had so far with trying to do silk painting on scarves. It’s a good thing I have a lot of patience and not easily discouraged, isn’t it? 😉

In the winter your plein air artist gets into craft projects and other kinds of art, but I’m looking forward to better weather so I can spend more time drawing and painting outdoors.

 

silk scarf painting workshop #2 / inspiration

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I haven’t mastered it yet, but this is FUN! I’ll take the class again. The teacher, Meryl Ann is a great help and showed me how to correct a mistake.

The oil paint sticks work nicely on silk. The paint doesn’t affect the drape of the fabric. They cost around $10 each color, so it’s worth the class just for that one reason. She has a lot of colors. But I made a mess of it and you can’t lift the color off if you put it in the wrong place or smear it. The thing to do is cover it with another design, then the mistake isn’t noticeable.IMG_2155

This photo looks a little out of focus, but I’m not a real photographer, so I don’t care.

Now I want to make my own templates. I have some good ideas. There’s a product like glue you can use to draw on a piece of cardboard to make your own template.

Also, the ladies in the class are very supportive of each other. It’s nice to hang around with other artists because art is mostly a solitary activity and this is getting me in friendly company.

silk scarf painting workshop

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I took a class this morning at Ocean View Arts where we painted on fabric with oil paint sticks. It was something I always wanted to try but didn’t know how to do it. The class was a lot of fun!

This photo shows my two practice pieces. You use templates with a raised surface, tape the template down and tape the fabric on top of it, then lightly rub the paint stick on top of the fabric and it picks up the design of the template.

The teacher, Meryl Ann, explains the process and gives you as many practice pieces as you want to do before you start on your silk scarf. I used an op art template and got a 3D effect on the black fabric. IMG_2153

This photo shows the template and my start on painting the scarf. I didn’t finish the scarf today but luckily there’s another class tomorrow night that I signed up for. I ordered 3 scarfs so I can give them to my mom and daughter for Christmas presents and have one for myself.

One nice thing about taking the class is the paint is included in the price of the class. The oil paint sticks are expensive. It was real nice to hang around with other artists and they are very welcoming to their group.

I’ll post pix of my finished scarfs in a couple days.